I have found over the past few months that trashy celebrity magazines can be really good places to find inspirations for improv articles – I know that sounds silly but I always come across some random things that can really actually get the creative juices flowing and create an article. A while ago I wrote an article inspired by an interview with Dominhall Gleeson.  So because that was a fun article to write I decided to delve back into them and found something

I came across a small article, I think it was in the same Grazia called ‘How to take Responsibility Responsibly’ with a list of bullet points of how you achieve said goal. Funnily enough though, some of these points actually work to make a really good improv scene. So, lets have a look at some of these points.

Pause before you say yes
This can be an important thing in improv – we are taught from day one to always say yes and accept what someone gives you on stage HOWEVER there are some times on stage when saying no can cause a really interesting scene. Also, another great thing you can do in improv is use actions rather then words. Before accepting an offer and saying yes use Physicality to portray the offer then actually just saying it in words.

Schedule slowing down time
When we go into a scene in improv your first instinct is to get everything out in your first sentence or few minutes on the stage. Obviously in short form improv it is important to get the information of Who, What, Where out pretty soon but in long form you can let it burn a little bit and build gradually.

Make sure you have a least half an hour to yourself
OK, so this one doesn’t really work for improv BUT it is important for your health to chill out after a show or just in life.

Observe what feelings come up when you do nothing

If you think about this in improvisation sense, this is a really interesting statement. When you are placed into a scene, think about how you are feeling, if there is a part of the scene where you are not saying anything just stop and think about how you actually feel as the character.

Ask yourself what you want
I think sometimes when you go into a scene, you forget to sort of ask yourself what you want to get out of the scene – what for you is the most important part of the actual scene – what do you want to get out of the scenario in front of you?

Realise that you are more then what you do

It is important to realise something in improv – no matter how big or small your appearance is in a scene you are bringing something great to it. Remember, everything in Improv is made up so even the smallest role in the scene can really make it something special and actually create the biggest laughs.