Three years ago i bought a book in Tampa which is meant to be a great for creative like minds and for the past three years I have made it my New Years Resolution to complete it. The book is called 642 Things To Write About by The San Francisco Writers Grotto. I never got round to writing many of them so what’s a better way then getting through them then writing a few as an article each week! Enjoy!

265. Write two descriptions of yourself for an online dating service. First, be the kind of guy / girl who’d be taken home to meet the mother. Then try a hot, sexy version. 

Hello, my name is Clara, I love baking, travelling, photography and making people smile. Looking for a wholesome relationship and someone who is my soulmate.

My name is Clara but you can call me sexy. I love “baking” of all sorts, travelling and photography – both of these I love to do sometimes in the nude, I am down for anything and everything – think you can keep up 😉

266. What is your favourite line or passage from a book, movie, play or poem? Try writing your own version of this line.

There are so many but here is one from the Autobiography of Lee Evans

“People have accused me of walking about in a dream world, seeing things around me others don’t see. But you know what I don’t care. I never liked beige.”

My version –  don’t care what others think, be different, stand out, be unique.

267. Go to the Merriam-Webster Word of the Day Website and write a story based on that word. 

 When I looked at the website, the word of the day was Woolgathering.

It was a warm day in the fields of Northumbria and Henry the Farmer felt it was a glorious spring day to go woolgathering. He took Sully the Sheepdog and wen to the fields to round up the sheep.

It took a while to get the sheep back in the barn (and a muddy puddle fall) but now it was time to sheer the sheep. The sheep looked like fluffy clouds at the moment but once they were sheered they would look slim and naked with a tuft of fluff.

The wool that was gathered would be used to make lots of cardigans by wife Betty.